Eight reasons why riding in a group is better than riding alone

You can get by with a little help from your friends

Eight Reasons Why Riding In A Group Is Better Than Riding Alone

There s something beautiful about taking off on a long solo ride1, nothing but you and the road. But then again, it can absolutely dull as ditchwater. So what s better than rounding up a few mates and hitting the road as a group to get your motivation and miles up. Here s eight reasons why riding in a group is much better than slogging it out solo.

>>> Eight reasons why riding alone is better than riding in a group2

The draft

If you re after the mileage but not after a day of suffering into a headwind, then get in a group. There s nothing quite like rolling along in a bunch pedalling with a lot less effort than you normally do but yet going much faster. If you re riding with a group of similar ability riders, than you can find the kilometres just tick by. Make sure you keep eating an drinking though, because you don t want to be the one bonking3 half way through because it felt all too easy.

Eight Reasons Why Riding In A Group Is Better Than Riding Alone

The chat

After four hours out on the bike by yourself, you might find that you ve not said a word for sometime. Except for maybe some expletives on that last climb.

>>> How to keep riding in your 80s4

But in a group, you ve probably got a whole load of other people to talk yourself silly about every intricate part of cycling that your family are fed-up of you rambling on about at home. Not only that, but your guaranteed to pick up some free pointers from the more experienced riders

Free advice

And who doesn t love a bit of free advice? Particularly if you re looking to get into some sort of racing, time trialling or long distance events5 for the first time, there s a good chance you ll be looking for a few pointers on how to firstly, survive it, and secondly, get better. If you happen to be the experienced one though, it s still good news, because you can impart your hard earned wisdom onto your riding mates and look like a boss.

Everyone s a winner.


Watch: How to use hand signals


You don t have to navigate (every time)

Got a designated leader for the ride? Excellent, just do your turns on the front, concentrate on the riding and be prepared to take absolutely no blame when you all get lost.

>>> Cycle computers: a complete buyer s guide6

Probably best not to be too hard on your lost leader though, because when it s you re turn to navigate and you get lost, they ll probably remember

You can test yourself

While you ll get yourself a free bit of draft for your trouble, there ll be occasions when you ll probably have to tackle a couple of climbs and that ll all go out the window. Rather than look at this as a dreaded moment to get dropped by your stronger riding mates, it s also a chance to test yourself and measure your improvement. You only get stronger by pushing yourself, and who knows, maybe you ll be the one leading up the climb in a few weeks.

Eight Reasons Why Riding In A Group Is Better Than Riding Alone

You can pool your tools

Stuffed your pockets full of food and gels? Well don t worry about taking that mini-pump or chain tool, because you and your mates can share the load. Might still be a good idea to take enough inner tubes though.

>>> 15 most annoying habits shown by cyclists7

You will actually go out

If you re lacking some motivation, having some friends to meet at a reasonable hour in the morning for a ride is the best way to make sure you actually get out and go. On those days when you d rather just stay in bed than get out training, having some riding mates you absolutely can not stand-up or let down will at least get you out the door.

Plus you might miss out on

Eight Reasons Why Riding In A Group Is Better Than Riding Alone

Someone else paying for your coffee

Free cake, free coffee.

You win.

References

  1. ^ taking off on a long solo ride (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  2. ^ >>> Eight reasons why riding alone is better than riding in a group (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  3. ^ bonking (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  4. ^ >>> How to keep riding in your 80s (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  5. ^ long distance events (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  6. ^ >>> Cycle computers: a complete buyer s guide (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  7. ^ >>> 15 most annoying habits shown by cyclists (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)

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