Revealed: The 10 foods Brits most like taking on holiday with them include ketchup, vinegar and Marmite

  • A third of Brits admit to packing a supply of home comforts to take abroad
  • Two thirds seek out British cuisine on Discount Holidays © holiday and rate Spain for serving it
  • 16 to 24-year-olds fussiest eaters and worry about not liking foreign food

|

35

View
comments

Sun cream, bikinis Marmite? Over a third of British holidaymakers admit to packing a supply of home comforts such as ketchup and vinegar when they go abroad, according to a new study. Plagued by a ‘fear of food overseas’ (FOFO), two thirds of the nation also seek out a taste of home on holiday, with Spain considered the number one destination to find British cuisine.

Over a third of British holidaymakers admit to packing a supply of home comforts such as Marmite when they go abroad, according to a new study

Almost a quarter of a million holidaymakers voted on the nation’s ultimate shopping list, with fish and chips, Sunday roast, and tea considered essentials at home. However, almost three quarters don t rate the way they are served up abroad and as such, squeeze food items into their suitcase. The top ten condiments to pack include ketchup, chocolate spread, Marmite and gravy granules, the Barclaycard’s Great British Shopping Showdown report reveals.

BRITS’ MOST POPULAR FOOD/DRINK TO PACK THIS SUMMER

1. Tomato ketchup

2. Vinegar

3.

Marmite

4. Jam

5. Chocolate spread

6. Long life milk

7. Butter

8. Seasoning mix

9. Chocolate flake

10.

Gravy granules

Once UK travellers have arrived in foreign climes, over a quarter (28 per cent) admit to looking for fish and chips and (20 per cent) are keen to sample a traditional roast or fry-up. In their efforts to enjoy the familiar flavours of home, UK tourists reported that they spend an average of 26.92 on eating British food whilst abroad during a week’s holiday. Spain was praised for perfecting some of the nation’s top dishes but France was voted the worst place to get a ‘chip butty’.

Instead the culinary country excelled, in holidaymakers’ eyes, at serving sweet treats and was commended by Brits for its scones and Victoria sponges. However, tourists claim you have to go all the way to the United States to find a good crumpet, outside of Britain. Diners blame a fear of not liking the local cuisine for their unadventurous menu choices.

For more than one in ten (11 per cent) this fear is greater than falling out with a loved one or swimming in the sea on holiday. Spain was praised for perfecting some of the nation’s top dishes but France was voted the worst place to get a ‘chip butty’

For British male travellers, this anxiety overrides that of flying or not having access to the internet. The study also revealed that tourists aged 16-24 years old are the fussiest eaters with almost a fifth (18 per cent) worried about not liking the local cuisine abroad.

Seren Evans-Charrington, food historian, said: ‘Tucking into local dishes should be part of the Discount Holidays © holiday experience, but for many Brits sticking to what they know is the preferred option because it gives them a sense of comfort: making them feel “at home” whilst abroad.

‘Although British travellers might want to sample British fare in far-flung lands, they also come back inspired by foreign cuisine and the increase in ‘exotic’ ingredients lining supermarket shelves is testimony to this.

‘In true British tradition, we will always add a little bit of our culture into any dish with a splash of Worcestershire sauce or a dash of tomato ketchup.’

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*