by StephenHurrell

Jesus Herrada takes the win in chaotic finish to Critérium du Dauphiné stage two

Movistar’s Jesus Herrada takes his first win of the year on stage two of the Crit rium du Dauphin , narrowly beating a trio of late attackers

Jesus Herrada Takes The Win In Chaotic Finish To Critérium Du Dauphiné Stage Two

Jesus Herrada (Movistar1) took the win in a messy finish on stage two of the Crit rium du Dauphine2, narrowly beating out three late breakaway riders on the line in Chalmazel. The Spaniard and the rest of the peloton left it late to catch Tony Gallopin (Lotto-Soudal3), Fabrice Jeandeboz (Direct Energie4) and Serge Pauwels (Dimension Data5), overtaking them with around 50 metres to go.

Herrada s teammate Dani Moreno6 had launched an attack a few metres earlier, but it was Herrada who saved enough energy for the final sprint to take his first win of the season.

>>> Crit rium du Dauphin 2016: Latest news, reports and info7

The day s five-man break splintered in the final 25km, and Alexis Gougeard (Ag2r La Mondiale) sped away from the only other survivor, Bartosz Huzarski (Bora-Argon 18), with 17km to go. Seconds before, Michal Kwiatkowski8 jumped away from the peloton and bore down on the retreating breakaway riders, passing Daniel Teklehaimanot (Dimension Data).

The Pole was joined soon after by Jeandeboz and Pauwels and eventually dropped back to the peloton himself. Jeandeboz and Pauwels were joined by Huzarski as they caught Gougeard, who couldn t hold the wheel of the group as he was swept up, and Gallopin also joined them 30 seconds ahead of the peloton. As the four riders climbed the 6km climb to Chalmazal where the finish line was located Tinkoff hit the front of the peloton in order to avoid race leader Alberto Contador9 losing time.

At opposing ends of the peloton, Mikel Landa attacked for Team Sky10 as his teammate Wout Poels surprisingly dropped off the back. As Daniel Navarro (Cofidis) attacked when the group was back together, it was Sergio Henao11 s turn to follow up the road for Sky and the pair opened up a slender lead, but it wouldn t last for long. The late break must have thought they d done enough as the best climbers in the peloton sprinted the final kilometre to try and catch them.

Joaquim Rodriguez12 (Katusha) was one of the big name riders to throw his name into the mix, but the Spaniard faded towards the end, allowing Moreno and Herrada to catch and pass the three riders ahead. Pauwels, Jeandeboz and Gallopin tried to hang on to the pair of Movistar riders but ultimately couldn t pull back Herrada, who took the win by two seconds.

Wednesday s stage three sees the riders take on the longest stage of the race with a rolling stage to Tournon-sur-Rh ne. With a category two climb coming 20km from the finish it could be one for the puncheurs and another day for the general classification contenders to target high finishes.

Results

Crit rium du Dauphin 2016 stage two, Cr ches-sur-Sa ne to Chalmazel (168km)

1. Jesus Herrada (Esp) Movistar, in 4-13-43
2. Tony Gallopin (Fra) Lotto-Soudal
3. Serge Pauwels (Bel) Dimension Data
4. Fabrice Jeandesboz (Fra) Direct Energie
5. Daniel Moreno (Esp) Movistar
6. Bauke Mollema (Ned) Trek-Segafredo
7.

Greg Van Avermaet (Bel) BMC
8. Chris Froome (GBr) Team Sky
9. Valerio Conti (Ita) Lampre-Merida
10. Joaquim Rodriguez (Esp) Katusha, all at 2 secs

Jesus Herrada Takes The Win In Chaotic Finish To Critérium Du Dauphiné Stage Two

Alberto Contador on stage two of the 2016 Dauphine-Libere

Crit rium du Dauphin 2016, overall standings after stage two

1. Alberto Contador (Esp) Tinkoff, in 8-53-18
2. Richie Porte (Aus) BMC Racing, at 6s
3. Chris Froome (GBr) Team Sky, at 9s
4. Daniel Martin (Irl) Etixx-Quick Step, at 17s
5. Jesus Herrada (Esp) Movistar, at 23s
6.

Julian Alaphilippe (Fra) Etixx-Quick Step, at 24s
7. Adam Yates (GBr) Orica-GreenEdge, at 31s
8. Diego Rosa (Ita) Astana, at 37s
9.

David Navarro (Esp) Cofidis, at 43s
10.

Bauke Mollema (Ned) Trek-Segafredo, at 44s

References

  1. ^ Movistar (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  2. ^ Crit rium du Dauphine (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  3. ^ Lotto-Soudal (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  4. ^ Direct Energie (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  5. ^ Dimension Data (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  6. ^ Herrada s teammate Dani Moreno (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  7. ^ >>> Crit rium du Dauphin 2016: Latest news, reports and info (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  8. ^ Michal Kwiatkowski (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  9. ^ Alberto Contador (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  10. ^ Team Sky (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  11. ^ Sergio Henao (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  12. ^ Joaquim Rodriguez (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)

Six reasons why mechanical groupsets are better than electronic

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it

Six Reasons Why Mechanical Groupsets Are Better Than Electronic

Sure, there are some reasons to buy an electronic groupset instead of a mechanical groupset1, but we ve done alright without batteries, wires, and junction boxes for so long that why do we really need to change? So if you re considering buying a new bike and can t decide between electronic or mechanical shifting, here are six reasons why you should stick with what you know.

1. There are no batteries to recharge

Six Reasons Why Mechanical Groupsets Are Better Than Electronic

Now where did I put that charger? A couple of months ago I got an old bike out of the back of the garage that was equipped with 20-year-old Campagnolo Veloce2, and you know what, with a bit of lube it worked perfectly. If this had been an electronic groupset then the batteries would probably have been flat after only a few months in storage.

>>> Are electronic groupsets necessary?3

If you re forgetful/disorganised then this can also be a problem. Yes the charge should last 1,000-2,000km depending on the system and there are little lights to tell you how much charge is left, but frankly you just want to be able to jump on your bike and know that everything s going to work. And you can bet your bottom dollar that the battery is going to go flat in the middle of a race too.

2. You can fix it yourself

Six Reasons Why Mechanical Groupsets Are Better Than Electronic

This should be enough to fix anything

What s your knowledge like of e-tubes and wireless protocols? In need of a brush up? Then what are you going to do when you re stuck in the middle of nowhere when something happens and you end up stuck in the 53 11?

>>> Seven essentials you need to take on every ride4

Well, if you re using a mechanical groupset then whatever has gone wrong will be able to be fixed with the sort of tools you ll find on any decent multi-tool. With electronic groupsets, this might not be the case.

3. No wires to come unplugged

Six Reasons Why Mechanical Groupsets Are Better Than Electronic

Those wires are just asking for trouble

If it s ultimate reliability that you re after, then mechanical cannot be faulted. Peter Sagan was ruled out of contention in the 2015 edition of Paris-Roubaix when one of his Di2 cables became unplugged, and a similar tale of woe befell one of Cycling Weekly s tech writers (who wishes to remain anonymous) who travelled all the way to the super-fast V718 10 mile time trial course in Hull in search of a PB, only to find himself stuck in a massive gear thanks to a loose connection.567

With mechanical gearing there s no chance of this happening. The shifting might not be quite as good as it could be if you manage to mess up the cable routing, but then that s your own fault, isn t it.


Watch: Buyer s guide to road bike groupsets


4. It looks better

Six Reasons Why Mechanical Groupsets Are Better Than Electronic

My eyes! The monstrosity that was the first generation Shimano Ultegra Di2 might be a thing of the past, but you still can t say that electronic groupsets look as smart as their mechanical counterparts.

as you ve usually got to have an ugly box hanging underneath your stem and have limp wires hanging down everywhere.

>>> Top five worst cycling inventions8

Compare that to mechanical with the elegant loop of the cable between emerging from the chainstay and joining up with the rear derailleur, and the much more minimalist appearance of both the front and rear derailleurs, and it s no contest.

5. You ve got more choice

Six Reasons Why Mechanical Groupsets Are Better Than Electronic

This isn t going to be going electronic any time soon

Want electronic shifting? Well you ve got six groupsets from three manufacturers to choose from? Decide to go mechanical? That number more than triples, and that s even before you start getting into hybrid groupsets or move away from the big three.

>>> Buyer s guide to road bike groupsets (video)9

There are also choices to suit every budget. You can get road bikes with mechanical groupsets from just 200, but good luck picking up a bike with electronic shifting for less than two grand.

6. It s much cheaper

Six Reasons Why Mechanical Groupsets Are Better Than Electronic

Is it really 1,000 better?

But even if you compare the costs of supposedly similar mechanical and electronic groupsets, then mechanical cannot be trumped. If you re looking at RRPs, then Ultegra is about 550 cheaper than Ultegra Di2, and Dura-Ace is almost 1,000 less than Dura-Ace Di2. One thousand pounds!

>>> The best road bike upgrades10

Yes the shifting of Dura-Ace Di2 might be that little bit better than plain old Dura-Ace, but 1,000 better?

No way.

References

  1. ^ some reasons to buy an electronic groupset instead of a mechanical groupset (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  2. ^ Campagnolo Veloce (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  3. ^ >>> Are electronic groupsets necessary? (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  4. ^ >>> Seven essentials you need to take on every ride (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  5. ^ Peter Sagan (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  6. ^ Paris-Roubaix (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  7. ^ the super-fast V718 10 mile time trial course in Hull in search of a PB, only to find himself stuck in a massive gear thanks to a loose connection. (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  8. ^ >>> Top five worst cycling inventions (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  9. ^ >>> Buyer s guide to road bike groupsets (video) (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  10. ^ >>> The best road bike upgrades (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)

Wout Poels leads Team Sky one-two in stage four in of Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana

Wout Poels wins stage four of the Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana ahead of Team Sky colleague Be at Intxausti to virtually seal the overall classification

Wout Poels Leads Team Sky One-two In Stage Four In Of Volta A La Comunitat Valenciana

Wout Poels on the podium following Stage 1 of the 2016 Tour of Valencia

Race leader Wout Poels1 solidified his position at the top of the general classification with a solo win at the Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana, with Team Sky teammate Be at Intxausti2 coming in second place. Dutchman Poels held off challenges from Diego Rosa (Astana) and Fabio Aru3 (Astana) on the final climb to Xorret del Cat and attacked near the summit to sail home by 23 seconds. His lead now sits at 46 seconds heading into the final stage on Sunday, with Luis Leon Sanchez requiring a minor miracle to overcome the Sky rider on a flat finish in Valencia.

Intxausti moves up to third overall, ten seconds behind Sanchez, with Rosa, who held third overnight, slipping to seventh overall. Stage five gives a pretty flat challenge, punctuated by a category three climb at the halfway mark.

Volta a la Comunitat Valenciana stage four, Orihuela-Xorret del Cat (141.3km)
1. Wout Poels (Ned) Team Sky, 3-26-32
2. Be at Intxausti (Esp) Team Sky, at 23s
3. Ion Izagirre (Esp) Movistar, st
4. Fabio Aru (Ita) Astana, at 25s
5. Daniel Navarro (Esp) Cofidis, st
6.

Luis Leon Sanchez (Esp) Astana, at 31s
7. Davide Formolo (Ita) Cannondale, at 38s
8. Sergey Firsanov (Rus) Gazprom-Rusvelo, st
9. Tom-Jelte Slagter (Ned) Cannondale, st
10. Javier Moreno (Esp) Movistar

Overall classification after four stages
1. Wout Poels (Ned) Team Sky, 12-03-26
2. Luis Leon Sanchez (Esp) Astana, at 46s
3. Be at Intxausti (Esp) Team Sky, at 56s
4. Ion Izagirre (Esp) Movistar, at 1-01
5.

Javier Moreno (Esp) Movistar, at 1-10
6. Fabio Aru (Ita) Astana, at 1-26
7. Diego Rosa (Ita) Astana, at 1-27
8. Jesus Herrada (Esp) Movistar, at 1-31
9. Daniel Navarro (Esp) Cofidis, at 1-34
10.

Leopold Konig (Cze) Team Sky, at 1-50

References

  1. ^ Race leader Wout Poels (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  2. ^ Team Sky teammate Be at Intxausti (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  3. ^ Fabio Aru (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)