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Italian teams ‘forced pro riders to pay to race’

On-going investigation in Italy centres on the practice of certain cycling teams to charge riders to join them, and charge them again if they want to leave

Italian Teams ‘forced Pro Riders To Pay To Race’

Italian teams Androni, Wilier-Southeast and Bardiani required professionals to pay to race according to an ongoing investigation with testimony from Olympic gold medalist Elia Viviani1 (Sky). On Friday morning, Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera lifted the lid on an Italian Olympic Committee (CONI) investigation. The case, after being closed twice by the Italian cycling federation (FCI), is going ahead thanks to the work of a CONI prosecutor.

Viviani did not have to pay to race, but confirmed in his June 14 testimony that Bardiani asked for money from Marco Coledan, the article read. Coledan, now with American WorldTour team Trek-Segafredo2, has denied the claims. But at least six other cyclists admitted to paying or to having to find sponsors to pay for their contracts.

The newspaper exposed the practice in both cycling and football last November. The practice has been easier to uncover in the two-wheeled sport.

>>> Bradley Wiggins s and Chris Froome s medical data released by Russian hackers3

The prosecutor called the managers of the teams Androni, Wilier-Southeast and Bardiani Gianni Savio, Angelo Citracca and Bruno Reverberi to testify. They risk a one-year to life ban, according to the article. They are accused of also signing professionals not for their sporting merit, but for the money they could bring to support the team. In addition, riders would have to pay in order to leave the team.

Cyclists parents or their family s business would be forced to cough up the cash to pay for a dream career as a professional. Italian Viviani, winner of the ominum gold medal4 in the Rio 2016 Olympics ahead of Mark Cavendish5, was CONI s star witness.



I remember, Viviani testified, that Coledan was surprised to learn that to break free from Bardiani he would have to pay a penalty. Because he said he received minimum wage, and no one had said that to free himself he d have to pay a sum of money.

The amount of this so-called penalty usually did not appear indicated with certainty and as a specific number.

The fee in what the article described as a 2+1 contract, or two years plus one big penalty went from ‘ 10,000 ( 8,450) to ‘ 15,000 ( 12,750) up to ‘ 40,000 ( 34,000).

References

  1. ^ Elia Viviani (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  2. ^ Trek-Segafredo (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  3. ^ >>> Bradley Wiggins s and Chris Froome s medical data released by Russian hackers (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  4. ^ winner of the ominum gold medal (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  5. ^ Mark Cavendish (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)

Belfast barrister dies on holiday in Spain

Tributes have been paid to a young barrister who died suddenly while on Discount Holidays © holiday in Spain at the weekend. Shona Killen, from Belfast, was a graduate of Queen’s University and specialised in criminal, family and mental health law. The 27-year-old, also an aspiring actress and singer, was well known for her charitable fundraising efforts supporting causes such as Alzheimer’s.

Chairman of the Bar of Northern Ireland Liam McCollum QC said: “It is with shock and great sadness that the Bar of Northern Ireland has learned of the sudden passing of our esteemed member, Shona Killen, this weekend while on Discount Holidays © holiday in Spain.

“Called to the Bar in 2011, Shona was a well-known and highly respected young barrister, endeared to all who knew her and renowned for her fundraising efforts.

“On behalf of the Bar, I would like to express our deepest condolences to her friends and family, assuring them of our thoughts and prayers and the provision of any and all support we can offer during this most difficult time.”

Cyclist’s café slip-up caught on camera (video)

Road cleats and shiny tiled floor – what could go wrong?

Is this the most embarrassing thing to happen in the cafe? @cyclingweekly @TheLadBible ft. @danielaled pic.twitter.com/iBoY3B6cuP1234

Jon Mould (@jonmould91) September 12, 20165

It s a moment that we all dread and perhaps one that we have personally experienced. Walking on tiled floors with cleated road shoes can be a complete nightmare, looking like a goose waddling on an icy lake. If you do slip up while navigating a caf on a mid-ride break, you can only hope that no-one sees you do it. Unfortunately, for one unlucky caf visitor, not only was his slip caught on the premises CCTV camera and in front of all of the people in the caf , it was then recorded by JLT-Condor6 rider Jon Mould and then broadcast on social media.

Mould asked in his post on Twitter7: Is this the most embarrassing thing to happen in the caf ?

>>> What your mid-ride caf order says about you8

Thankfully, the rider involved named as Daniel Aled Davies is not carrying any hot drinks when he takes a spill. And no cake was harmed during the making of the film. He momentarily tangles with another customer and soon gets back up on his feet to find the relative safety of a table and chairs. Anyone who invents a lightweight slip-on super-grippy rubber sole for cleats that can be popped in a back pocket and then produced when needed at a caf stop will get our money on Kickstarter.

References

  1. ^ @cyclingweekly (twitter.com)
  2. ^ @TheLadBible (twitter.com)
  3. ^ @danielaled (twitter.com)
  4. ^ pic.twitter.com/iBoY3B6cuP (t.co)
  5. ^ September 12, 2016 (twitter.com)
  6. ^ JLT-Condor (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)
  7. ^ post on Twitter (twitter.com)
  8. ^ >>> What your mid-ride caf order says about you (www.cyclingweekly.co.uk)

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