politics

Vote in the UK holiday ‘Oscars’ and win a dream holiday for free

Vote in this year s UK Discount Holidays © holiday Oscars and you could win a dream travel prize – but you’ll need to hurry! The Daily Mirror and Sunday Mirror have teamed up with the prestigious 2016 British Travel Awards1 the benchmark for excellence for the firms that make your time off extra special and it s your votes that count. So don’t hang around the big public vote closes at midnight on September 30!

Quite simply, these are the UK travel industry s most prized accolades because they re voted for by the people who pay hard-earned money for their holidays and services. The 82 prize categories include best overseas tour operators, cruise lines, hotels and staycation leisure attractions. To thank you for taking the time to join in, everyone who submits a vote is entered into a draw for a treasure chest of fabulous getaway prizes with more being added regularly.

Vote In The UK Holiday 'Oscars' And Win A Dream <b><i>Discount Holidays ©</i></b> Holiday For Free The New York themed 2015 awards night Vote In The UK Holiday 'Oscars' And Win A Dream <b><i>Discount Holidays ©</i></b> Holiday For Free Awards chief Lorraine Barnes Burton

There are some tremendous travel treats to win. In the Aladdin s cave of goodies, worth more than 35,000, there are Discount Holidays © holiday packages, cruises, flights, Discount Holidays © holiday vouchers and discounts. British Travel Awards chief Lorraine Barnes Burton said: The BTAs give Daily and Sunday Mirror readers the opportunity to vote for who they think provides the best service and products when it comes to those all-important holidays and you could be winning next year s holiday, just by voting. So don t miss out. This is the largest consumer-voted programme in the UK, and in 2015 more than 250,000 British households took part, casting well over a million votes.

The award winners will be announced at a glittering gala evening in London on November 23.

Vote In The UK Holiday 'Oscars' And Win A Dream <b><i>Discount Holidays ©</i></b> Holiday For Free

How it works

Voting is all online at britishtravelawards.com2 – You simply register, then vote and it s all scrutinised by leading accountants Deloitte. It s not limited to UK residents, so if you re reading our international editions or you re an overseas online reader, then you can vote too. There are 82 award categories, but you don t have to vote in every one you can opt for as many or as few as you want, right up to midnight on September 30.

And it s really simple. If, for example, you only want to vote for your favourite all-inclusive Discount Holidays © holiday firm and nothing else, you can.

Read More

The online voting form allows you to return to it as many times as you like up to September 30 to dip in and out, to change your votes or add new ones. You will also be invited to take part in a survey that looks at the nation s Discount Holidays © holiday plans for 2017. It s entirely voluntary and, like the awards voting, you can do as much or as little as you like.

As a thank you for taking part in the survey, you get a bonus entry in the Discount Holidays © holiday prize draw.

The fab prizes on offer simply for voting

Some of the amazing prizes you could win include:

  • A 14-night Titan tour of America s Deep South. This trip of a lifetime is for two people and is worth around 5,000. It takes in civil war and civil rights history, musical heritage in Nashville, Memphis and New Orleans, the Elvis Presley Birthplace and Museum in Tupelo, a steamboat jazz trip on the mighty Mississippi, a visit to Jack Daniel s Distillery and much more
  • A weekend break for two to Rome with HolidayPirates, including flights for two and accommodation for two nights in a three-star hotel, worth over 500. Soak up the history and culture of the Italian capital, visiting museums, art galleries and ancient monuments and be sure to sample the cuisine.
  • An eight-day cruise for two along the Danube with Viking Cruises, including flights, six guided tours and all meals on board, worth over 5,100. Hungary s vibrant capital Budapest, Vienna s elegant caf s and Austria s Wachau Valley all await you.
  • Two pairs of flights for two people with Opodo, worth 2,500. Choose between Lisbon and Porto for your sundrenched break in Portugal, then jet off to Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. Flights are with TAP Portugal.
  • A week s villa Discount Holidays © holiday for two in Kefalonia, Greece, with Ionian and Aegean Holidays, worth 2,500. Flights, accommodation and resort transfers or car hire are all included in this beautiful break to the largest island of the Ionian sea, with white sandy beaches and pebbled coves.
  • Rental of a sporty BMW X6 M for a long weekend with Sixt Rent-A-Car, worth over 1,100.

    Pick up your stylish wheels on Thursday at noon and hand the keys back on Monday morning

  • A five-day break for two to Krakow
  • A seven-day China tour for two people (excluding flights)
  • A 750 villa Discount Holidays © holiday voucher
  • Two 500 cottage Discount Holidays © holiday vouchers
  • A five-star, all-inclusive week for two by the Red Sea
  • Two flights to Rio de Janeiro
  • A week s skiing for two in the French Alps
  • A 1,000 Cornwall Discount Holidays © holiday home voucher

References

  1. ^ British Travel Awards (www.mirror.co.uk)
  2. ^ britishtravelawards.com (britishtravelawards.com)

Belfast barrister dies on holiday in Spain

Tributes have been paid to a young barrister who died suddenly while on Discount Holidays © holiday in Spain at the weekend. Shona Killen, from Belfast, was a graduate of Queen’s University and specialised in criminal, family and mental health law. The 27-year-old, also an aspiring actress and singer, was well known for her charitable fundraising efforts supporting causes such as Alzheimer’s.

Chairman of the Bar of Northern Ireland Liam McCollum QC said: “It is with shock and great sadness that the Bar of Northern Ireland has learned of the sudden passing of our esteemed member, Shona Killen, this weekend while on Discount Holidays © holiday in Spain.

“Called to the Bar in 2011, Shona was a well-known and highly respected young barrister, endeared to all who knew her and renowned for her fundraising efforts.

“On behalf of the Bar, I would like to express our deepest condolences to her friends and family, assuring them of our thoughts and prayers and the provision of any and all support we can offer during this most difficult time.”

The last British commissioner

To receive the Brussels Briefing in your inbox every morning, sign up here1

For candidate European commissioners, a few guiding principles can help them survive confirmation hearings at the European Parliament: know something about your policy area, don t have a dodgy past, and say lots of nice things about MEPs. But Sir Julian King, Britain s candidate to join the commission, had no precedents to draw on for his hearing with parliament s civil liberties committee on Monday evening. His aim: to become the first EU commissioner from a country planning to leave the EU.

The Last British Commissioner

If you d told me a few months ago that I d be sitting here I d probably not have believed you, he told the hearing in Strasbourg. It is a particular situation. He came through it well.

On policy issues, he confidently tackled a barrage of technical questions on his new brief as security commissioner with queries on everything from counter-terrorism to data encryption. Sir Julian also benefited from the fact that his new responsibilities are in area where many in the parliament believe that the European Commission needs to be more active, meaning they welcome the impetus that could come from the creation of a security commissioner post. That thirst for more policymaking may help explain why, in the end, Sir Julian did not face many direct questions about the large elephant in the room.

Those that did come did so mainly from pro-Brexit MEPs from Britain itself. UKIP s Gerard Batten asked: which master you will cleave to? London, or Brussels. He got a clear answer: I don t think that you should read anything into my nomination to do with the wider issues of Brexit, Sir Julian said. I m not here as a representative of the British government.

He now looks a shoo in to be formally confirmed later this week as Britain s new, and very possibly last, EU commissioner. But that Brexit elephant will still be hanging around.

Email: Twitter: @jimbrunsden

Hungary row Luxembourg s foreign minister demanded that Hungary beexcluded from the EU3 for its mistreatment of refugees. Jean Asselborn argues that exclusion is the the only way to preserve the cohesion and values of the European Union . Other countries (cough) Poland should watch out, said Asselborn, who also argued that it should be possible to suspend someone from the EU without unanimity.

Warsaw Discount Holidays © holiday tour Poland s Law and Justice party s parliamentary leader underlined how little Warsaw cares about international scrutiny. The visit of the Venice Commission in Warsaw is very much a Discount Holidays © holiday tour, said Ryszard Terlecki, referring to a visit of the human rights watchdog4. We do not attach particular importance to it. All that we had to tell the Commission, we already have.

The Rachman plan The FT s Gideon Rachman comes up with a two-tier solution5 for the EU s woes: a tight federalist bloc with Germany and (probably) France at its centre and a periphery of those who are sceptical of further political integration, including the Visegrad group, the Irish, the Dutch, the Swedes and the Danes. The euro awkwardly bestrides both. But an EU with a defined tertiary bloc would rather appeal to the Brits, giving the UK the option of staying.

Voila! Full piece6.

The Last British Commissioner

Not an EU army The push for tighter defence strategy in the EU continues: France and Germany have put out another paper7 spelling out how it should work. Some historically neutral countries such as Ireland and Austria are nervy, while others are concerned about diminishing Nato s role, which was not just a British concern.

TTIP is alive Or so says Washington s chief negotiator8.

The clear message we are getting from EU member states is that, notwithstanding these recent comments there is a clear desire to keep moving forward, he said. And the closer you are to negotiations the more confident you are that in fact negotiations are moving forward.

Facebook legal woes Facebook faces another day at the European Court of Justice, after the court was asked to rule9 whether a class action against the social network in Austria was valid10. The case is being run by Max Schrems, an Austrian student who has almost single handedly made life very difficult for the $360bn company over the past five years.

Brits do quit Mere months after declaring Brits don t quit , David Cameron has resigned for a second time this time as an MP. It marks aninauspicious end11 for the former prime minister, who pledged to continue as a backbench MP. The reaction has been unkind. This Daily Telegraph piece12 David Cameron s petulant resignation as an MP shows why he leaves no lasting legacy and that he doesn t care – was typical.

Secret talks Brexit minister David Davis warned his fellow MPs13 that they should not expect to be 100 per cent in the loop during negotiations.

Clearly there is a need for parliament to be informed without giving away our negotiating position.

I may not be able to tell you everything, even in private hearings.

The comments came during a hearing in which there was some levity, according to MLex s Matthew Holehouse14:

David Davis met Irish ministers for talks in Dublin, and told them of Irish heritage.

They assumed I was applying for a passport.

Email: Twitter: @duncanrobinson16

References

  1. ^ FT.com – Alerts Hub (nbe.ft.com)
  2. ^

1 2 3 180